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Stafford Basin goals and objectives

Planning and conservation    Natural areas, parks and trails    Protecting natural areas    Acquiring natural areas    Stafford Basin    Goals and objectives

Learn about the goals and objectives for habitat and water quality protection in the Stafford Basin target area. View maps illustrating the Metro Council's priorities in this area and learn more about the importance of the area to our region.

The Metro Council's goal and objectives for the Stafford Basin target area are:

photo of Stafford Basin target area

Goal

  • Protect lands in the Stafford basin along tributary creeks to the Tualatin River to enhance water quality protection, provide floodplain storage, secure diverse natural areas for local residents and provide regional trail connections.

Objectives

Tier I Objectives

  • Preserve lands along Wilson Creek to link existing protected lands and to create corridors for wildlife habitat and future trail use.
  • Protect lands along Pecan Creek to link existing protected lands and to create corridors for wildlife habitat and future trail use.

Tier II Objective

  • Protect lands along the south bank of the Tualatin River from Fields Creek to Willamette Park for wildlife connectivity.

Partnership Objective

  • Work with Three Rivers Conservancy, City of Lake Oswego, City of West Linn, City of Tualatin, and other partners to leverage regional bond funds.

About the area

The Stafford Basin is a triangular shaped area located south of Lake Oswego, west of West Linn and east of Tualatin. Much of the Stafford Basin includes working farms and housing developments. The area is bisected by the Tualatin River and contains tributaries, riparian areas and floodplains that are important to protecting water quality. Along with providing flood storage, the floodplains and associated wetlands support considerable numbers of waterfowl and migrating neo-tropical birds. Wilson Creek, Pecan Creek and Athey Creeks are important waterways in the area. In particular, Pecan and Wilson creeks have excellent habitat restoration potential.

The City of Lake Oswego has preliminary plans to construct a trail along Wilson Creek that would connect the Tualatin River to their existing local trail system near Luscher Farms. Plans are also underway to construct another one and a half miles of trail between Luscher Farm and West Linn along the north side of Rosemont Blvd. The City of Lake Oswego, Three Rivers Land Conservancy and other partners have developed a Stafford Basin Path and Trail Plan that identifies at least 15 miles of new trails connecting protected parks and natural areas in Lake Oswego, Tualatin and West Linn. As of 2005, two miles of trails included in the plan have been completed.

2006 Natural Areas Program bond description

Connecting existing public lands in the Lake Oswego/West Linn/Tualatin area along tributary creeks to the Tualatin River will enhance water quality protection and secure diverse natural areas for local residents.

Focus for the 2006 Natural Areas Program

  • Connect existing public lands in the Lake Oswego/West Linn/Tualatin area.
  • Enhance and protect water quality and secure diverse natural areas.
  • Initial estimates are that a minimum of 200 acres of land would be protected within this target area.

Field research and scientific data findings

  • Lands along the creeks, floodplains and associated wetlands of the Tualatin River are important to protecting water quality, providing flood storage, and supporting large numbers of waterfowl and migrating birds.
  • Wilson and Pecan creeks both have excellent wildlife corridor connectivity with large areas of intact habitat supporting diverse plants and animals.
  • There are potential opportunities for habitat protection and trail connectivity near the confluence of the Tualatin River and Saum Creek.
  • The south bank of the Tualatin River from Fields Creek to Willamette Park has excellent connectivity potential due to large, diverse habitat areas, including oak woodlands.
  • Fields Creek has unique high quality forested habitat supporting diverse wildlife and connectivity.

Public input helps Metro Council set priorities

In September 2007 the Metro Council approved acquisition plans for each of the 27 regional target areas. The Metro Council established these priorities with the input of natural resource and land use experts, scientists, citizens and local land managers. More than 500 people attended eight community open houses to share their ideas with Metro Councilors. Nearly 1,000 people filled out questionnaires ranking their priorities and offering ideas for partnerships and other ways to stretch the public's investment. The acquisition plans include a map, goals and objectives for each target area.

Need assistance?

Natural Areas Program
503-797-1545
naturalareas@oregonmetro.gov

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